EINSTEIN@HOME - Team FreeBSD

A team dedicated to the users of FreeBSD running BOINC under linux compatibility mode, or a native FreeBSD BOINC build. Team FreeBSD is dedicated to users of FreeBSD, but not limited to JUST the users. Anyone with the interest in developing a community of people interested in technology, open standards, NIX or BSD based operating systems are welcome and encouraged to earn credits and share ideas and conversation.

http://einstein.extracted.org

 [RSS]

For those of you wondering what the EINSTEIN@HOME Project is:

Einstein@Home uses your computer's idle time to search for weak astrophysical signals from spinning neutron stars (also called pulsars) using data from the LIGO gravitational-wave detectors, the Arecibo radio telescope, and the Fermi gamma-ray satellite. Einstein@Home volunteers have already discovered more than a dozen new neutron stars, and we hope to find many more in the future. If you want to participate, please follow the "Join Team FreeBSD" instructions below. It takes just a minute or two to sign up, and little or no maintenance to keep Einstein@Home running. Einstein@Home is available for Windows, Linux and Macintosh OS X computers, and Android devices.


EINSTEIN@HOME Links EINSTEIN@HOME - FreeBSD
EINSTEIN@HOME Project
EINSTEIN@HOME APS Page
EINSTEIN@HOME Server Status
EINSTEIN@HOME in the News
EINSTEIN@HOME Message Boards
The FreeBSD Project [Foundation]
EINSTEIN@HOME Beta Testing
BOINC - FreeBSD Ports
BOINC - FreeBSD Install

EINSTEIN@HOME Data Sources
EINSTEIN@HOME Final S3 Results
EINSTEIN@HOME S4 Analysis
EINSTEIN@HOME Report on the first S5 Analysis
EINSTEIN@HOME Arecibo Binary Radio Pulsar (Re-)Detections
EINSTEIN@HOME Arecibo Mock Spectrometer Pulsar Search [ALFA]
EINSTEIN@HOME Parkes Multibeam Survey Data
EINSTEIN@HOME Gamma-Ray Pulsar Discoveries

EINSTEIN@HOME - Team FreeBSD

Join Team FreeBSD and participate in the EINSTEIN@HOME project. To create an account for EINSTEIN@HOME, first download and install BOINC from [here]. Next, run BOINC, attach to the project Einstein@home (http://einstein.phys.uwm.edu/) and enter an email address and password. This will create your account. Registration is closed to other methods such as website account creation. Keep your boxes blazed!

Team FreeBSD Stats @ http://einstein.phys.uwm.edu/ [message board]
Team FreeBSD Stats @ http://boincstats.com/ [users] [movement]


Show Archives
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Welcome to our Team


27 April, 2016 23:06 CST6CDT

Welcome to our team Frankenbox, you are among friends! Keep your boxes blazed!


Welcome to our Team


19 February, 2016 06:51 CST6CDT

Welcome to our team Kevin, you are among friends! Keep your boxes blazed!


It's official! We have detected gravitational waves for the first time and proved one of Einstein's theories!


11 February, 2016 11:05 CST6CDT

It's official! We have detected gravitational waves for the first time and proved one of Einstein's theories! Two black holes colliding and merging into one.  Congrats Bruce Allen for being on stage as director of Einstein@Home and many more LIGO and related collaborations.

You will find the scientific paper on the first direct gravitational waves observation here: https://dcc.ligo.org/public/0122/P150914/014/LIGO-P150914%3ADetection_of_GW150914.pdf


Where To Watch Einstein's General Theory of Relativity (Gravitational Waves) Press Conference Streaming


11 February, 2016 07:11 CST6CDT

updated 08:46:18 2016-02-11

Albert Einstein Catching Some Rays


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''It would be possible to describe everything scientifically, but it would make no sense; it would be without meaning, as if you described a Beethoven symphony as a variation of wave pressure'' -- Albert Einstein

My name is Andy Wright - the founder, but really the creator of Team FreeBSD. If you want me to add any links, or have any questions or inclinations for such things related to our group (or to just say hi) - send me an e-mail: einstein@extracted.org or Skype name: extracted

Space.com RSS Feed

05/28/2016 06:10 AM
1st Inflatable Habitat for Astronauts All Pumped Up on Space Station
Astronauts aboard the International Space Station are inflating the first privately built expandable space room today (May 26), adding another node to the orbiting outpost.

05/28/2016 05:00 AM
SPACE WEBCASTS: NASA Inflating BEAM Space Station Habitat
NASA will attempt to inflate the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module at the International Space Station for the second time on Saturday (May 28) at 9 a.m. EDT (1300 GMT). Watch live here, courtesy of NASA TV.

05/27/2016 10:25 AM
Jaw-Dropping Descent Of SpaceX's Falcon 9 First Stage | Time-Lapse Video
A camera on-board the first stage of the rocket captured its descent back through Earth's atmosphere and onto a droneship in the Atlantic Ocean on May 27, 2016. It was used to launch the Thaicom 8 communication satellite.

Science Daily RSS Feed

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Total Credit, Last 60 days (based on the daily update numbers)

Total Credit, Last 60 days (based on the daily update numbers)

Total Credit, last months (based on the daily update numbers)

Total Credit, last months

Credit per day, Last 60 days (based on the daily update numbers)

Credit per day, Last 60 days (based on the daily update numbers)

World Position History, lower is better, Last 60 days (based on the daily update numbers)

World Position History, lower is better, Last 60 days (based on the daily update numbers)

World Position History, lower is better, last months (based on the daily update numbers)

World Position History, lower is better, last months

World Position (by RAC) History, lower is better (based on the daily update numbers)

World Position (by RAC) History, lower is better (based on the daily update numbers)

EINSTEIN@HOME RSS Feed

03/09/2016 08:34 AM
First search on the advanced-generation LIGO detector data
The first E@h search on the advanced-generation LIGO detector data (O1) has started ! We are searching the sky for gravitational wave signals with frequencies between 20 Hz and 100 Hz. We have packed two searches in a single application: one for standard ever-lasting continuous gravitational waves and the other for continuous signals lasting only some days. The run was designed to last no more than a few months because we have a long list of exciting searches that we want to launch on the O1 data: we want to look at frequencies above 100 Hz and also concentrate our computing power on a few specific promising objects.

Since the last gravitational wave run we have developed a faster application that hinges on the power of the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. There is no such thing as a free lunch so we are paying a price for this : the performance of our application depends now on the size of the cache of the volunteer computer that it is running on. In order to be able to assign credit fairly for the work done by all volunteer hosts and in order to balance well the computational load among the different hosts, we have split the work for this search in two separate runs for different host classes. A work-unit from any of these runs is equally likely to harbour a signal and both runs are crucial to the search!

M.Alessandra Papa for the E@H team

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